Federal Financial Aid available to those who qualify - Register today: (602) 243-1179

GUITAR EFFECT PEDAL

Upcoming Class

March 30-31, 2019 (2 Days)


Classes meet on Saturday & Sunday, 9am – 5pm.


This class is open to the public - Cost: $425


Download an Electives Application from our Forms Page

About Our Pedal Class

The Roberto-Venn Guitar Effect Pedal class is a one weekend introduction into analog effect pedals.  The student will build a silicon NPN replica of the famous Dallas-Arbiter Fuzz Face used by Jimi Hendrix.

 

While it’s possible to simply purchase the kit yourself and assemble it for about half the cost of the class, the experience of learning from experts in the field is more than worth the additional cost.  Instructor led learning will eliminate the confusion that comes from trying to build with nothing more than a schematic and a wiring diagram.  And you will leave class with a basic understanding of how your pedal works!


Instructor

Jim Kramer is an electronics test engineer with more than twenty-five years in the industry.  He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics from Ottawa University.  Jim specializes in radio frequency test and measurement at all levels from wafer fabrication to space craft payloads.  He has worked for such companies as Qualcomm, Intel, Hewlett-Packard and Motorola. Jim was trained on vacuum tube electronics in the United States Marine Corps where he worked on air traffic control radar systems that still contained tubes and discrete transistors as late as the 1970’s.


Jim is a trained musician with both a jazz and classical background.  He studied music at Scottsdale and Mesa Community Colleges in Arizona where he played upright bass and trumpet in various jazz ensembles and violin in orchestra.  He also played ‘cello with the Mesa Metropolitan Orchestra under Maestro Ladislav Prcik.  Jim continues to play upright bass in various small jazz and country-folk music combos.  His favorite guitars are the Gibson ES-175 and J-45.  He loves JJ vacuum tubes because they are named after his hero, J. J. Thompson, who discovered the electron.